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Quick Tips (Read 5280 times)
Mike Chock
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Quick Tips
Mar 13th, 2002 at 9:55am
 
This tip was on our old message board...but since its a winnah   here it is once more:  the Evans Ohana  gave me this tip..... instead of purchasing expensive nut files for various string diameters....at 11 to 12 bucks a pop plus shipping......visit Air Liquide    or Gaspro   ask for torch tip cleaner sets..should be anywhere from 3 bucks and up  for a complete set. You will get a bunch of different diameters jes right for string slotting.They cut a bit slower but do a right fine job and ya can't beat the price....try  em   and let me know.Hana  lIma has a bunch and will test it out on the final class session next week ....laters   ukeman
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mike chock
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Re: Quick Tips
Reply #1 - Mar 18th, 2002 at 10:25am
 
Here's another cheap fast tip to make yer sandpaper last longer.When you are shoe shining your uke necks with long strips of sandpaper...put some long strips of masking tape on the backside of the sandpaper for make the sanding strip stronger so it don't break in half when you go through the shoe shine sanding routine. Consider this another Pake tip for save money...hah from a true chinaman.....laters
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grasshopper
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Re: Quick Tips
Reply #2 - Mar 19th, 2002 at 5:07am
 
Yup,
That sandpaper saver sounds like a good one.  Been always getting pissed cause the bugga keeps tearing before the sandpaper no good so kept losing some good expensive sandpaper.  Cry  Will definitely try that one out. 

And another tip for when you going rout rosette channels or binding ledge .... to help minimize tear out or that sloppy edge, give the board a couple of wash coats of shellac or for you that spray, a couple coats of laquer, before routing.  It seems to help.  A good sharp bit don't hurt either. 

Later,
gh
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mike chock
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Re: Quick Tips
Reply #3 - Mar 22nd, 2002 at 11:52am
 
Pothole repairs....hey here's a tip from the road crew over at the City and County....

rules of the road:

when repairing small cracks or infills and you are using the fine dust from the same materials that you are going to fill with use a compatible binder to the dust. Example ..if you are infilling voids on your ebony fretboard...a combo of fine ebony dust with Titebond is cool as well as superglue.     If filling grain lines..deep kind on your oil finish.....use a comparable dust with oil as a binder...or straight oil drop fills....if was on lacquer use lacquer drop fills to fill grain pockets. 

ok    the tip was from Fine Woodworking....but the pothole pavers are  trippy too.....laters   mike

by the by.....the above tip of coating your uke or guitar before routing channels for bindings and or purflins is a good tip cus it will help minimize tearout..try it
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mike chock
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Re: Quick Tips
Reply #4 - Mar 25th, 2002 at 9:43am
 
A slick tip from the girls in the band.  Fingernail files...yup those emory board wonders are a must. Great tool for tight flat sanding and you can cut  up the emory board to diferent sanding shapes.Works right nice in those tight heel curve and body joint locations.Steal them from your wife or girlfriend...or bettah yet buy yer own.....laters   ukeman
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mike chock
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Re: Quick Tips
Reply #5 - Apr 2nd, 2002 at 1:24pm
 
Here's a tip for those who like to use disposable brushes for glue applications:  To make disposable Glue Brushes last a Long  Long   long  time....save your yogurt cups..wash em out and in the plastic lid cut yourself a slot that will allow a disposable glue brush to fit right in. Fill the cup half way with clean water and store your brush in the container wiith the handle sticking out of the slotted lid...the water will keep the glue on the brush bristles from hardening and ya can keep reusing the same brush forever....just change the water  once a week or so. You now won't have to pick  coats of dried glue off your fingertips and your glue application coats will be a bit more uniform...... oh before you use the brush dab the wet end into a napkin to get off the excess water    ....then apply your glue.......laters,   ukeman
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mike chock
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Re: Quick Tips
Reply #6 - Apr 22nd, 2002 at 11:32am
 
Another old tip worth repeating::::   purchase at your local Office Depot or Longs Drug Store...flat retangular erasers...whatever sizes they have you can find good use for. Wrap sandpaper around the eraser and you will have an effective and convenient flat sanding block for small areas. Especially effective at the curved heel areas of the neck...and the flat areas adjacent to your fingerboards.I buy Magic erasers via Office Depot in a 3 pack....must work good cus they always seem to disappear...this is when Stick It sandpaper with the sticky back is really convenient...if not jes wrap and hold with your fingers...later      mike
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Ukeman
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Re: Quick Tips
Reply #7 - Jun 20th, 2002 at 1:33pm
 
heres a good tip for all you ukemakers who play with inlays and way out designs...When you complete your design...either input it on a computer so you can print out many copies or go down to  Office Depot and use their copy machine to reduce or enlarge your drawings and make copies.Use the copies to cut and create your inlay shapes by pasting on copy with Elmers white glue...its a weak glue and comes off easy with a bit of water.I find it best to finish the inlay first and then using the completed inlay ...trace the actual outline on the soundboard, headstock or fingerboard. Use a razor blade or exacto knife to score the  inlay outline jes inside the pencil tracing outline and either chisel or dremel away the excess inside materials.....now your recess will be a shade smaller than your  actual inlay design piece...which is good.   Using  various diameters of short dowels...wrap stickit paper around one end of dowel...flush to the end.....using the dowel vertically you can rub the inside edge of your inlay  cavity a bit at a time and slowly fit your inlay piece dead ass tight. Works pretty good...so try it out........laters   ukeman
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Ukeman
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Re: Quick Tips
Reply #8 - Sep 11th, 2002 at 9:37am
 
Been binding as of late...lots of work getting binding nice and true to the sides ,tops and backs. Plastic is a bugger to sand..gums up from the heat..so heres a good and super effective scraping tip...the only way to go on plastics...use glass...microscope slides..thin about an eighth thick small rectangular slides..the kind you put the bug on under the microscope....Use as a scaper and you will be amazed...cuts like a champ...clean and beutiful...works with wood binding better than a single edged razor....the boys from the third world country..short on expensive tools...high on ingenuity..saw a guy in Thailand use broken glass bottles to scape his furniture pieces ...amazing...so the microscope slides are a winnah........later ukeman
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Ukeman
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Re: Quick Tips
Reply #9 - Mar 31st, 2003 at 11:40am
 
Aloha people...Been bending some extraordinary  full curled koa sides and been experimenting on bending different ways with the heat blanket. I have been a blanket bender for many years with the blanket on the form and the wood on the blanket...yup can see so much easier. Tried the other way around for the full curl koa sides reasoning that the blanket on the wood would give me additional compression on the wood sides and keep the curls from faceting or cracking along its curl direction...

Results...very promising! The sides bent without much incident and the shape retention sets even more with blanket on top than blanket below. Yes its you cannot see what you are bending and will have to trust the feel of the wood giving.And yes you have to index the sides to keep it straight with the bender too. I will experiment a bit more post the results...any of you out there who are wood first and blanket on top benders...let me know!

laters  ukeman
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Ukeman
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Re: Quick Tips
Reply #10 - Apr 24th, 2003 at 3:38pm
 
aloha people...Since UGH just put on a binding demonstration last week which was so well attended here's a few tips for the anal oriented to make the binding fit tight:
1. Pre bend your wood binding carefully 4 pieces at once...tape the binding adjacent together tightly and then slip into your side bender. Bend slowly and carefully.

2. You can make a touch up mould for the prebent bindings...same uke half shape on a piece of 3/4" ply and tape the prebent bindings on this mould. Use heat gun to bend spots that are flat or not really well bent. Just spot spray, heat gun and tape tightly to mould all junky spots.

3. Pre fit your bindings into your routing channels to check fit.

4. Sand the inside corner of the binding where it will meet the inside bottom of the channel..if you ease the corners the binding going fit mo bettah.

5. No glue until your dryfit is spot on! Yup use plenty masking tape to dry fit..its cheap!

6. if all is well go ahead and glue and bind and tape tight. Alternate the masking tape ..tape side pull tight to top...and tape top and pull tight to sides.  Like Dat!

7. Where ever possible a 45 degree joint going look better than a butt joint.

8. prepare stips of tape before you glue and bind...double up a bunch of tape strips too...stronger pull at the severe bends...50 or 60 strips.

8. I make cauls that match the upper bout curve, left and right side. The waist curve, left and right side and the lower bout curve yup left and right side. When I pau bind going quick like a swift I put the cauls at their respective locations with a piece of masking tape and then I clamp the pairs together at these three locations. I put one more clamp to smoosh the butt tail joint ends together too! Its a pain but these puppies help keep the bindings in nice and tight. Remember, no can see bindings cuz all covered with masking tape.

9. when dry and all pau..strip tape and check the job. If get small spots where the binding still never get dead tight you can spot spray and with the flat tip of a soldering gun heat the spot and then clamp in..no forget to force glue into the crack.

Remember no bind till you check your routed binding channels too.
good luck binding  laters  ukeman
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david
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Re: Quick Tips
Reply #11 - Aug 17th, 2003 at 10:22am
 
Sad   the other day my brother in law left his ukulele in his truck with all his windows rolled up .... after three hours he came back and got his uke and walked over to a group of friends to jam ( small kine birthday party) well when he opened up his uke case , yep you got  sound board cracked, wow a grown man cry Sad so pass the word   no leave your uke in the car truck or whatever
          ok see ya Grin
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Ukeman
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Re: Quick Tips
Reply #12 - Aug 18th, 2003 at 4:47pm
 
ahsook....what a bummer...gee da humidity is really high as of late so that truck interior must of been like a sauna..so the uke wood went through all kinds of changes....yup good lesson but just like a pet or a child..no leave an ukulele unattended in the car or the trunk...plus if you left em in plain sight most likely be ripped off too....it's a valuable intrument gotta take precautions.....ukeman
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achock
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Re: Quick Tips
Reply #13 - Aug 19th, 2003 at 10:16am
 
Aiyah!@  Cry That is a sad story, and such an easy thing to do.  You just never think it could get that hot in there so fast.

Makes me wonder what happens to ukes on the mainland.  What would it do to your uke to go from the warmth and humidity of a heated home to the back of a freezing car? Or what if your uke gets too cold then you bring it inside?  This has to cause some major problems...
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urusai
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Date and time stamp when you glue
Reply #14 - Nov 6th, 2003 at 2:41pm
 
"Does anyone know when this was glued?"

Ever looked at your neck/fretboard/headstock and wondered what time it was when you glued and clamped it?  Lately I have been sticking a piece of masking tape to whatever it is that I am gluing and recording the date and time on it.

Cuts down on those "blank stare at the clock" moments.  Grin

This tip works especially well in a shop environment where clamps are in high demand.  At least now you can make an educated guess as to when it is okay to remove the clamp.
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