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Lining vs. kerfing (Read 2030 times)
hapakid
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Coeur d'Alene, Idaho
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Lining vs. kerfing
Jan 29th, 2004 at 7:38am
 
Some luthier books recommend only lining on the bottom and kerfing for the top or vice versa. Others recommend kerfing on top and bottom, mainly so you can route it for binding. I'm wondering if a uke won't sound better (louder) and be lighter with lining only, if you don't plan on putting on binding.   My old Kamaka only has lining that has been notched a little so it would bend.  My newest uke has only linings and feels lighter and more vibrant (not strung up yet) than my all kerfed ukes.
Anyone have a preference? Jesse Tinsley
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DeVine_Guitars
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Lahaina, Maui
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Re: Lining vs. kerfing
Reply #1 - Feb 1st, 2004 at 7:49pm
 
Hi Jesse, in my personal opinion every luthier has their own "theory"  about EVERY part of building. I think kerfing has a lot less influence on the sound than other factors such as, what the sound board is made of and the thickness, the brace system, and what the back & sides are made of and thier thickness. I have built identical ukes with two different sets of koa, where one was lighter than the other (sometimes because of more age)  and they have a slightly different sounds. The lighter being the more resinent. In general, the lighter you can build it without weak spots, the better the sound.  I have had great results with stew-mac's mandolin kerfing. It is made of spruce and small, light, and stable. But the most important thing to remember is, to have fun!
Eric DeVine
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Eric DeVine
 
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David
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Re: Lining vs. kerfing
Reply #2 - Feb 2nd, 2004 at 4:45pm
 
Eric,
     I have to agree with you on your last statement, YES, have fun.  Thats what it's all about, if the uke has a little flaw, well we just start making another one and try again.    Grin                                 
                             David
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Ukeman
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Re: Lining vs. kerfing
Reply #3 - Feb 12th, 2004 at 1:05pm
 
hello all!
I have a piece of willow in my possession and will proceed to make willow tentalones. Sergei DeJonge a great Luthier out of Oshawa, Canada uses willow for his tentalones or kerf liners. The willow is very light and very flexible, just did'nt think I could score some in Hawaii...we get em! Mahalo fo da boat!
Lots of guitars have linings installed on the back side edge and tentalones on the soundboard edge...the reasoning was normally the guitars were all bound, back and front, but only the soundboard surface had the fancy colored purflins...so to install the added width needed to install the purflins, tentalones were used. Since the backside only had bindings a liner was nuff.
I've seen great guitar makers use solid linings, tentalones installed grooves out and tentalones installed grooves in and an awesome guitar with laminatied linings that actually formed curved x-bracings for the guitar back plate.
Jon Y uses sitka tentalones, I use spanish cedar and mahogany, and now willow. Lots of builders use only solid linings. Guess try em and choose what works best for you....laters  ukeman
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