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Glue for wood bindings? (Read 2877 times)
Txdd1
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Glue for wood bindings?
Sep 12th, 2005 at 7:25am
 
OK uke builders...what do most of you use for glue when doing wood bindings?

I have done plastic bindings with "Weld-on" cement (as sold by StewMac) with great results. I like the workability of it and the fairly quick set up time. Plus if any is gotten on the sorrounding wood it can be wiped off with little or no affect.

I have done a few wood-bound ukes with Titebond with fairly good result, but I don't like the slow set up and have had some instances where it "moved" a little under the tape and caused a "gap" which later needed to be filled.

Anyone out there have any other things they have tried? What were your experiences / lessons learned.

Any help / advise is greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Todd
"The Uker of OZ"
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Road_Toad
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Re: Glue for wood bindings?
Reply #1 - Sep 12th, 2005 at 4:12pm
 
I use the Luthier's Mercantile white glue. I think it dries a little faster than the Titebond 1 and dries fairly clear as opposed to yellow. I do sometimes get that movement of the binding under the tape if the pre-bent binding is not the exact shape of the binding channel, but if you dry fit the binding and make the little bending adjustments to tweak the fit, you'll end up OK. Stiff masking tape helps- the less stretch, the better and I start with the tape on one of the sides and I push the binding flush into the channels while pulling the tape tightly over to the top or back. The other thing I do is to route a second channel to put in a fineline fiber black/white/black purfling strip between the body & the binding. Make the channel depth just less than the thickness of the purfling and it acually expands out a little to fill any very slight gaps between body & binding when sanded flush to the body. It also creates a nice contrast.

Owen
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Txdd1
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Re: Glue for wood bindings?
Reply #2 - Sep 13th, 2005 at 3:11am
 
Owen,

I'll have to try the white glue, that sounds like it may be better.

I have not yet tried to do purfling. I am still getting the hang of binding, figured I better master one technique before diving into something else.  I do like the contrasting look of purfling, just haven't gotten up the guts to try it yet.

Being self taught, it obviously helps to get as much info and other people's experiences on hand before jumping into to something. I am also a "see it, then do it" type of person. So, usually if I can even get a glimpse of how someone else did something, a tool, a jig, whatever, then I usually have the confidence to try it. But I'm sure as many of us know, taking that first cut, or pushing that router into the side of an instrument for the first time is a little hairy!

Anyway, thanks for the tip, I'll give it a try.

Todd
"The Uker of OZ"
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rcelley
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Re: Glue for wood bindings?
Reply #3 - Sep 14th, 2005 at 5:46am
 
hey there txdd1

road toad makes a really good point about wrapping the tape up and over. Also I think it's one of those tasks that doesn't have to be rushed. glue 5 or 6 inches of channel and then take your time getting it taped up tightly. If your fingers get tired stop for a while, (possibly massage them with cold aluminum) and go back later when you can really focus on it again. I hate filling those gaps, especially when I know they were my fault for being impatient and rushing it. that brown colored titebond (or is it elmers?) can help make the tiny gaps less obvious if you are binding with brown wood. that gorilla glue is a little harder to use efficiently with bindings but it does expand while drying and the gaps go away. it can still look sloppy though if your channel is sloppy to start with.
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Rich Celley
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Ukeman
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Re: Glue for wood bindings?
Reply #4 - Sep 14th, 2005 at 1:51pm
 
Aloha all!

A nice procedure for wood bindings that I use for my ukes is as follows:

1. Size binding to router width and depth. Binding should be a shade proud than the depth of cut. The width of cut can be same as the binding or a hair deeper....key word (hair.)

2. pre bend all wood bindings and dry fit to routed out channel! Must fit exact! Do all your scarf joints (45 or 90 degrees on both all bindings pieces. Mark binding ends on the showing rim plate of your uke at the tail end centerline. If doing 45's ..index mark is a shade past center to center of 45.

3. pre cut all masking tapes and have em hanging on the edge of your work bench.   extra step for the anal: take out your uke template and trace the mid upper bout bend, the waist center and the lower bout mid point curve onto 6 seperate ply scraps and cut out the outer shapes of you uke at these points...now ya got outer outline pairs of cauls at the upper, lower and waist bouts. Keep em handy near your binding table!

4.You are routed, bindings prebent and dry fitted and alls right with the universe!

5. For the anal: take your binding pair and with a sanding block ease the inside bottom corners of your binding pair...fit will be nicer and tighter.

6. Starting with one binding from the tail index mark glue the routed channel...I glue one entire half at a time. I also add glue to the binding inside and bottom face.

7. some of your masking tapes strips should be doubled..one strip onto another..need strong pull at waist and curves.
8. Start taping the binding with the first tape at your index mark and with a double tape....and continue around the uke....I alternate tape pulls...example: plate to sides then next tape sides to plate...I overlap my taping as well...and so on till finished.

9. when pau (finished) I use my waist, upper and lower outside cauls with a bit of tape at each location and clamp these cauls in place.

10....remove clamps and tapes in an hour or so and start the next side.

If I do get any unwanted gaps I find that I can close some of these gaps by using a heat gun with a cardboard protector at the offending gapped spot. Make a caul to the same shape as the gap location...a card board protector...fold cardboard in half and at the fold ( if you lightly score the cardboard at the fold line will fold clean)make a 1" x 3/8"slot cut out. Place cardboard slot at the gap area and heat with heat gun...will melt existing glue and make the gap area a bit pliable...add caul and clamp...should do the trick!

over and out   laters  ukeman
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Todd_Korup
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Re: Glue for wood bindings?
Reply #5 - Sep 15th, 2005 at 2:10am
 
Great stuff...

{rcelley} - I like the brown glue idea. Duh....why didn't I think of that? Sometimes things are just too simple.


{ukeman} - As always, good advise! There are alot of little tricks in your reply that I will try. Especially the cauls.

Thanks everybody for the good tips, it's well appreciated!

Todd
"The Uker of OZ"
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Todd&&"The Uker of OZ"
 
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Dale Schroeder
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Re: Glue for wood bindings?
Reply #6 - Sep 20th, 2005 at 3:45pm
 
On a related note, I want to do  a double binding.  Both bindings are synthetics.  Any tips or tricks on how to proceed?  Should I use super glue between the two? This is the first time I'll try a double binding, so I'd like to avoid any critical mistakes.

Mahalo in advance,
ukehacker
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rcelley
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Re: Glue for wood bindings?
Reply #7 - Sep 20th, 2005 at 5:55pm
 
dale
it's easier , i think anyway, to glue the bindings together into one then glue the now single piece into the channel. You can use super glue or many people simply use acetone to melt them together which does create a very smooth bond. Provided of course that you don't just end up with a bi-color puddle of melted plastic HAHAHAHAHAHA. No really it's quite common but I couldn't even begin to describe how I do it, but I'd love to hear how Ukeman handles that, if there's an easier way I'd love to know it and if there's a jig or a tool anyone knows of that would be great too.
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Rich Celley
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Ukeman
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Re: Glue for wood bindings?
Reply #8 - Oct 5th, 2005 at 3:28pm
 
aloha all....Here's a method for plastic bindings and purflins that the late custom uke makerLes Reitfors used! Les bound lots of ukes with plastic multi pieced bindings and purflins and here is his method.....have both channels routed....single channel for bindings only, step channels for bindings with purflins...All channels test routed on scrap to make sure they fit perfect with materials being used.......get a bunck of masking  tape strips at the ready on your work bench edge and a bottle of both cyno and accelerator. Les started at one end and with all pieces at once fitted about 3 to 4  inches of materials into respective channels...a few drops of very viscous (ultra thin) cyno (superglue) and a fast spritz of the accelerator a few well placed masking tape strips and then onward to the next 3 or 4 inches..cyno, spritz, tape and repeat till near the end of opposite end of uke! Cut ends to fit prior to gluing your last few inches and all should be cool. Les then removed tapes from starting end and scraped clean with scraper or a microscope glass piece..you can get these at scientific supplies real cheap and cuts like glass (ha). If need be can palm sand as well.....this method suited Les as he could make choke ukes in a week...all custom and detailed!        The slower route would be with number 16  IPS Weld-On plastic cement.....need much tape strips and liberal use of the plastic cement well coated in your channels....you can do 1/4 of the uke at a time. Both ways work really well with the latter a bit less destructive to your lungs...the cyno is nasty stuff....laters   ukeman
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