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Question about neck scarf joint cutting (Read 9467 times)
Jeff B
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Aloha!

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Amelia, OH (near Cincinnati)
Gender: male
Re: Question about neck scarf joint cutting
Reply #15 - Jan 28th, 2008 at 9:28am
 
Nifty! That arrangement would solve my problem of having neck blanks of different thicknesses, as well.

I must say that your jig looks to be built strongly enough that it could also support an 18 wheeler!! Grin

Mahalo!

Jeff
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Don_Orgeman
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Re: Question about neck scarf joint cutting
Reply #16 - Jan 29th, 2008 at 3:42am
 
Jeff:

Part of the reason for the double MDF layer is to get over the raised pivot on the back of the saw, but the real reason is I'm an engineer and prone to overbuild.  I hate having a tool/jig flex or bend and not giving me the results I'm looking for.  Also, I tend to use what I have available in the shop resulting in a 4X4 fence.

Don
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Jeff B
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Aloha!

Posts: 55
Amelia, OH (near Cincinnati)
Gender: male
Re: Question about neck scarf joint cutting
Reply #17 - Jan 29th, 2008 at 4:48am
 
Ha! I understand.

I've become a scrounger, as well, when it comes to making jigs. I also have a habit of saving every little scrap of wood I can. I always see a possibility in it for something, sometime. And after years of doing remodling work on our house I have a LOT of scraps in all different shapes, sizes, and types of wood. The problem is that I haven't taken the time to organize it so it is scattered all over the place in various containers - or not...

Grin

Jeff
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Acabooe
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Re: Question about neck scarf joint cutting
Reply #18 - Mar 6th, 2008 at 7:31am
 
Ok everyone, here is what I did.

I have a table saw... well sort of, it is in really bad working shape, so using that was not an option.
I wanted to see what I could do with my japanese pull saw.
I made the line with a pencil an straight edge, then I clamped the wood down and began to saw.

Things didn't go as I had hoped that they would.
The joint looked absolutely horrible.
I needed to clean it up a bit.

I first tried using 60 grit sand paper, but that took forever + a week, so I resolved to use my rotary tool, and planer.

The planer worked better, but not perfect.
N e wayz, after the joint looked better, I used some spare blocks of wood, and alot of clamps, and I made a gluing Jig.

After gluing, there was still unfortunately a gap at the scarf joint. I guess it will be covered up with the ears.

Then I glued on the heal blocks, and I was done with that step.

I know that it doesn't look great, but I am using this Ukulele project as a learning experience, so I will be better next time.

Hope you like the pics.
Aloha
Bob 8)

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Matt Blacka
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MAKAIO Ukuleles Australia

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Sydney, Australia
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Re: Question about neck scarf joint cutting
Reply #19 - Mar 6th, 2008 at 11:36am
 
Hi Bob,

Ahhh the joys of trying to get a scarf joint done nicely.....

I have completed one uke about 2 years ago, and am now in the process of doing four ukes at once, which are all a bit different to each other, and I have just finished doing the scraf joints on them.

For my first uke I used a band saw to cut my scarf joint, and then cleaned up with a sanding block. The finished joint was good, but it took a lot of work to get it there.

For the batch of ukes I'm doing now, I made a jig to cut the scarf joints on a sliding compound miter saw (the jig was much like the other peoples' that have posted pictures here, but somewhat uglier).

None of the joints came off the saws perfectly. The jig that I used on the compund saw created a flat but slightly off square cut, which had to be squared up on all four necks with a sanding block. This wasn't a major problem. All four necks moved slightly during glue up, which again I have fixed up using a sanding block. No problems.

In my experiences, getting a good scarf cut and glue up is difficult even with a band saw or miter saw, and requires well made jigs or a reasonable amount of work cleaning up with a sanding block.

You are correct in thinking that the gaps in the joint should be covered up by the ears, at least on the sides of the headstock anyway. Any gaps on the face side can be covered by a face plate, and any on the rear side can also be covered by a plate, if absolutely necessary.
So a few small gaps shouldn't be a major problem, so long as the joint is still strong.

I see that you used one clamp to hold the wood to the table and one across the scarf joint during glue up. I have used significantly more clamps to close the scarf joint than this when doing my joints, like two treble side, two bass side, and one in the middle, plus the one to hold everything to the table. I find that this helps to close any small gaps/imperfections in the joint between the two pieces of wood, as it provides better control on where most pressure is applied. Anyway, maybe this is overkill, and caused my problems with the joints moving slightly during glue up?

Anyways, nice job on the neck blank. One of my favourite parts of the building process is shaping the neck, so have fun with it, and remember its easy to take away, hard to put back.  Smiley

Matt

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MAKAIO Ukuleles, Australia www.makaioukuleles.blogspot.com
 
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Don_Orgeman
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Re: Question about neck scarf joint cutting
Reply #20 - Mar 6th, 2008 at 5:38pm
 
Matt:

I thought I was going crazy to try to get my scarf joints adjusted perfectly.  Lots of practice cuts and adjustments with shims and I finally got what I thought would be a perfect cut.  When I cut the actual necks they all came out just a hair off square.  I also had the same problem as you with minor slipping during glue up even though I dry fit the neck into the clamping assembly first.

You are 100% right.  Some 80 grit sandpaper on a sanding block does wonders to correct any problems.  Lesson learned: Don't worry too much about being perfect.

Hey guys, my spelling is lousy.  Is there a spell checker hidden somewhere that I am missing to catch errors in my posts?

Don
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